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brucesterling:

It looks very boring because it was the front for an insanely advanced cyberwar project successfully wrecking Iranian nuclear weapons facilities.
http://arstechnica.com/security/2013/02/new-version-of-stuxnet-sheds-light-on-iran-targeting-cyberweapon/
“The newly discovered version 0.5 also displays similarities to Flame in the way the attackers went about camouflaging the command-and-control servers used to send updates to infected machines. The earlier Stuxnet was programmed to connect to servers with four different domain names, each disguised as hosting a website for a nonexistent advertising agency called Media Suffix. The sites included smartclick.org, best-advertising.net, internetadvertising4u.com, and ad-marketing.net. Ominously, their tagline, according to archived pages of the now defunct sites, read: “Deliver what the mind can dream.”
“Similarly, the Flame espionage malware relied on servers that were disguised as publishing platforms running a fictitious content management application called Newsforyou. The disguises reduced the chances that the true purpose of sites would be discovered by people working at the data centers where they were hosted or by people who happened upon the sites while browsing the Internet.”

DELIVER WHAT THE MIND CAN DREAM


Reblogging for lies.com.

brucesterling:

It looks very boring because it was the front for an insanely advanced cyberwar project successfully wrecking Iranian nuclear weapons facilities.

http://arstechnica.com/security/2013/02/new-version-of-stuxnet-sheds-light-on-iran-targeting-cyberweapon/

“The newly discovered version 0.5 also displays similarities to Flame in the way the attackers went about camouflaging the command-and-control servers used to send updates to infected machines. The earlier Stuxnet was programmed to connect to servers with four different domain names, each disguised as hosting a website for a nonexistent advertising agency called Media Suffix. The sites included smartclick.org, best-advertising.net, internetadvertising4u.com, and ad-marketing.net. Ominously, their tagline, according to archived pages of the now defunct sites, read: “Deliver what the mind can dream.”

“Similarly, the Flame espionage malware relied on servers that were disguised as publishing platforms running a fictitious content management application called Newsforyou. The disguises reduced the chances that the true purpose of sites would be discovered by people working at the data centers where they were hosted or by people who happened upon the sites while browsing the Internet.”

DELIVER WHAT THE MIND CAN DREAM

Reblogging for lies.com.