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Posts tagged with "sponsored posts"

sink—florida—sink:

WHY IS THERE AN ADVERT FOR A HORROR MOVIE ON MY DASH TUMBLR I FUCKING HATE HORROR MOVIES I DO NOT WATCH HORROR MOVIES I EITHER END UP TERRIFIED AND HAVING NIGHTMARES FOR WEEKS OR I GET TRIGGERED INTO SELF HARMING MYSELF OR BOTH!! WHY IS THIS BULLSHIT ON MY DASH STOPPIT

is there a way to block sponsored posts?

Check out XKit and Tumblr Savior. Both are browser extensions that will let you block posts that match certain criteria. Lately all the horror movie sponsored posts I’ve seen have been tagged with #horror, so you should be able to block based on that, assuming that:

  • It really is something Tumblr is requiring horror movie advertisers to do consistently, and 
  • you aren’t browsing from a phone or tablet.

But really, the decision by Tumblr to run ads for horror movies as part of the sponsored posts program is all kinds of fucked up. I’m sorry you had to experience the consequences of it.

robinvenetia:thankYeah. I’m glad they’re tagging the ads now, and glad they’ve stopped showing actually-dead people.Still sucks for mobile users without blocking options, because those who promote horror movies are fully capable of creeping non-horror-fans the fuck out without showing corpses.

robinvenetia:

thank

Yeah. I’m glad they’re tagging the ads now, and glad they’ve stopped showing actually-dead people.

Still sucks for mobile users without blocking options, because those who promote horror movies are fully capable of creeping non-horror-fans the fuck out without showing corpses.

anonsally:

lies:

I’ve noticed another apparent inconsistency between Tumblr’s stated policies and the horror movie ads in the Sponsored Posts program.
I posted previously about how the ads appear to violate Tumblr’s Community Guidelines. But they may also violate Tumblr’s Acceptable Advertising Policy, which says that “content that falls into the following categories won’t be approved to run as Sponsored Posts”, and lists this as one of the categories:

Content related to death

It would be interesting to hear Tumblr explain the logic that was used to determine that this ad for The Conjuring (warning: horror) is not “content related to death.”

This is an excellent point. They are violating not just their guidelines but their policy. How do we get them to stop?

[[MORE]]
Something that occurs to me is that the specific sponsored post I linked to above (the ad for The Conjuring, with the feet of the dangling corpse) appeared in my dash last summer, when that movie was in theaters. I don’t know when Tumblr’s Acceptable Advertising Policy page, with the specific mention of “Content related to death”, was first published, but it looks like it was after that.
The Internet Archive’s Wayback Machine has two copies of that page, both of them identical to the current version. The first time it was retrieved was March 14, 2014. So if that was not too long after the page went live, it raises the possibility that the Acceptable Advertising Policy, including the “Content related to death” provision, was enacted at least in part in response to concerns about that particular ad for The Conjuring. It might even be the case that our (and others’) complaints played a role in getting Tumblr to restrict the types of images used in horror movie ads.
The particular restriction they imposed (no images of death) seems suggestive. It could be that Tumblr’s lawyers were concerned about the kind of legal exposure I discussed in my post earlier today.
This makes me feel both good and bad. Good, because it may mean that Tumblr has taken a quiet step to tone down some of the worst aspects of the horror movie ads. But bad, because this action doesn’t go very far, and looks like an effort to water down the Community Guidelines.
The latest horror movie ad I received in my dash was a couple of weeks ago, well after the appearance of the new Acceptable Advertising Policy. It was this sponsored post for The Only Way Out Is Down (warning: flashing images of mutilated humans/zombies/something or other). And yeah, there are no actual corpses, so in that sense it complies with the new policy.
It’s still horrific. It’s intentionally horrific. It depicts gore and mutilation. As such, it violates the pre-existing Community Guidelines.
Tumblr appear to be creating a two-tiered system for regulating disturbing content: One set of rules for regular users, as embodied in the older Community Guidelines. And a second, looser set of rules for itself and its advertisers, as embodied in the new Acceptable Advertising Policy.
That’s an unfortunate progression for users.

anonsally:

lies:

I’ve noticed another apparent inconsistency between Tumblr’s stated policies and the horror movie ads in the Sponsored Posts program.

I posted previously about how the ads appear to violate Tumblr’s Community Guidelines. But they may also violate Tumblr’s Acceptable Advertising Policy, which says that “content that falls into the following categories won’t be approved to run as Sponsored Posts”, and lists this as one of the categories:

Content related to death

It would be interesting to hear Tumblr explain the logic that was used to determine that this ad for The Conjuring (warning: horror) is not “content related to death.”

This is an excellent point. They are violating not just their guidelines but their policy. How do we get them to stop?

Read More

I know this doesn’t begin to address the larger issue, but just for your personal comfort, have you blacklisted ‘sponsored_badge_icon’? Once I did that, I stopped seeing the horror movie ads (thankfully).

Yes, I blacklisted that as soon as I could. Unfortunately, I still see the ads when using the Tumblr app on my iPad.

My persistence in talking about this isn’t based primarily on my desire to solve the problem for me personally. It’s based more on my desire that Tumblr do a better job of living up to its own stated values, since those are values I agree with and think are important.

cribblesticks replied to your post “Well, crap”

Well if she seems like a pretty cool person, appeal to her like you would appeal to a pretty cool person: with your personal experience, honest request and any relevant info/suggestions.

anonsally replied to your post “Well, crap”

Whine more politely? Use reason and logic and make it a request rather than a demand? Point out how it benefits them to make that change?

All good points; thanks. My current plan is to think about it some more, maybe eventually sending an ask or two to whomever seems most likely to be directly involved.

I want to assume good faith on the part of the relevant decision-makers at Tumblr. It’s possible that they’re just too busy, too immersed in the go-go frenzy of a successful tech startup, and that having a CEO and a bunch of director-level officers still in their 20s means they just haven’t thought this through. Perhaps a patient, persistent effort to point out the implications will help them see the value of modifying their actions to more closely match their stated ideals.

I’ve noticed another apparent inconsistency between Tumblr’s stated policies and the horror movie ads in the Sponsored Posts program.
I posted previously about how the ads appear to violate Tumblr’s Community Guidelines. But they may also violate Tumblr’s Acceptable Advertising Policy, which says that “content that falls into the following categories won’t be approved to run as Sponsored Posts”, and lists this as one of the categories:

Content related to death

It would be interesting to hear Tumblr explain the logic that was used to determine that this ad for The Conjuring (warning: horror) is not “content related to death.”

I’ve noticed another apparent inconsistency between Tumblr’s stated policies and the horror movie ads in the Sponsored Posts program.

I posted previously about how the ads appear to violate Tumblr’s Community Guidelines. But they may also violate Tumblr’s Acceptable Advertising Policy, which says that “content that falls into the following categories won’t be approved to run as Sponsored Posts”, and lists this as one of the categories:

Content related to death

It would be interesting to hear Tumblr explain the logic that was used to determine that this ad for The Conjuring (warning: horror) is not “content related to death.”

Well, crap

Danielle Strle (Tumblr’s director of product for community and content) seems like a nice person, and worse, has a cool Tumblr dad. I no longer feel comfortable whining at her about my horror-movies-in-sponsored-posts concerns.

Must regroup to consider strategy. Suggestions welcome.

analyticisms:

Debunking the myth that Tumblr is only used and populated by kids.
unwrapping:

Age Ranges of Tumblr’s Global Audience:Tumblr sees about 150 million global unique visitors monthly. comScore, an Internet analytics firm, averaged Tumblr’s age ranges over the first quarter of 2014 for both Dashboard and blog network traffic worldwide:
Ages 13 to 17: 15%
Ages 18 to 34: 41%
Ages 35 to 54: 29%
Ages 55 and up: 15%
"People are often really surprised to note that we have the same percentage of 55-plus-year-olds as we do 13-to-17-year-olds," said Danielle Strle (strle), Tumblr’s director of product for community and content, in an NPR webinar. “But over half of our audience is solidly in the 13-to-34 demographic.”



So, more than 15% of Tumblr’s users are older than me.

Also, I’m going to stop whining at david and staff about the sponsored posts that feature gore, mutilation, and corpses. Because strle's title of “director of product for community and content” makes it sound like maybe I should be whining at her instead.

analyticisms:

Debunking the myth that Tumblr is only used and populated by kids.

unwrapping:

Age Ranges of Tumblr’s Global Audience:
Tumblr sees about 150 million global unique visitors monthly. comScore, an Internet analytics firm, averaged Tumblr’s age ranges over the first quarter of 2014 for both Dashboard and blog network traffic worldwide:

  • Ages 13 to 17: 15%
  • Ages 18 to 34: 41%
  • Ages 35 to 54: 29%
  • Ages 55 and up: 15%

"People are often really surprised to note that we have the same percentage of 55-plus-year-olds as we do 13-to-17-year-olds," said Danielle Strle (strle), Tumblr’s director of product for community and content, in an NPR webinar. “But over half of our audience is solidly in the 13-to-34 demographic.”

So, more than 15% of Tumblr’s users are older than me.

Also, I’m going to stop whining at david and staff about the sponsored posts that feature gore, mutilation, and corpses. Because strle's title of “director of product for community and content” makes it sound like maybe I should be whining at her instead.

Submitted to david's Ask Me Anything:Why do you allow sponsored posts depicting gore, mutilation, and corpses to be inserted into users’ dashboards? Isn’t that a violation of Tumblr’s own Community Guidelines?Warning: Links lead to disturbing images of horror (first three) and aggravating hypocrisy (last one).

Submitted to david's Ask Me Anything:

Why do you allow sponsored posts depicting gore, mutilation, and corpses to be inserted into users’ dashboards? Isn’t that a violation of Tumblr’s own Community Guidelines?

Warning: Links lead to disturbing images of horror (first three) and aggravating hypocrisy (last one).

looking to ask tumblr staff a question Please help!

a-little-fallof-cosima:

how convenient they don’t have an ask feature on the staff page

i know certain things can be sponsored posts on my dashboard regardless of whether i follow the blog or not 

today i came across a sponsored post from the movie “As Above so Below”. The post contained gifs of horrifying zombies and general movie gore/scary things.

i do not normally have this stuff on my dash because i generally tend to follow blogs about broadway musicals and stuff. I feel that other users might be frightened and uncomfortable as the gifs are made to stun or shock and, in my opinion, sort of like silent “screamers”.

I looked at the post and BECAUSE it was sponsored there was not a way to dimiss it or block it on my dash. I went to the original poster and the tumblr staff page, neither of which have ask boxes so here i am making this post.

I am not looking to censor tumblr in any way I am just looking for a way that posts I do not follow nor want to see on my dash can be dismissed regardless of sponsorship.

I am all for tumblr making money through whatever but I wish they screened the sponsored posts more or made it easier to dismiss. I am asking tumblr staff to at least address this problem. I know I don’t have too terribly many followers but if you could reblog this and help me to bring this to their attention it would be great. Thank you so much for your time reading this 

Yup.

If you are using a desktop computer, rather than a smartphone or tablet, the XKit browser extension and the Tumblr Savior extension may be helpful. Both have features to help you avoid seeing posts that contain specific content or have specific tags.

When horror movie sponsored posts first appeared they did not include tags. These days they appear to be tagged with #horror, at least some of the time. It’s possible Tumblr is requiring that, or at least requesting that, of advertisers.

Something I’ve asked Tumblr support about in the past (without getting a specific reply) is the fact that sponsored posts depicting gore, mutilation, and corpses appear to violate Tumblr’s own Community Guidelines, which say, in part:

Don’t post gore just to be shocking. Don’t showcase the mutilation or torture of human beings, animals, or their remains. Dick.

Cute, huh? They feel righteous enough to call a gore-posting user “dick”, while doing the same thing themselves.

Actually, what staff (really david, Tumblr CEO David Karp) is doing is worse than some random user posting gore. If a regular user were doing that I could just unfollow and/or block him. When david posts gore in my dash there’s nothing I can do. He requires Tumblr’s users — presumably including children as young as 13 — to look at such posts as a condition of using the service. That’s kind of messed up.

I’ve written more about this here:

Good luck!